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Success Stories

Military Malpractice: Attorney Success Stories

We discuss the settlements and verdicts we achieved in military malpractice cases, not to brag or to promise the same results for you –  no ethical lawyer can promise you a recovery, much less guarantee a multi-million dollar result. However, we hope presenting a sample of our results will give you confidence that we know what we are doing and that we do it well, time after time, case after case.  

We have included both “lows” and “highs,” to show you that the recovery in any legal matter is dependent upon its own unique fact situation and applicable law, including damage caps.  Just as no two people are exactly alike, no two cases are exactly alike. The recovery in any legal matter is dependent upon its own unique fact situation and applicable law. For example, results in seemingly very similar cases can vary greatly, based just on where the incident occurred.  To discuss damages in your case, you may contact us and/or to read about how damages are calculated please see: FAQs “How much is my case worth?”

Birth Injury

$65 million: Army doctors do D & C while mother is pregnant: baby suffers severe brain injury.

B.L. v. United States (Germany). Army doctors at Heidelberg Army Hospital and Landstuhl Regional Medical Center did a D & C on a pregnant woman, negligently believing the reason for her growing uterus was a tumor not pregnancy. The settlement included cash and a medical trust to cover the needs of the child for life. The projected lifetime payment from the settlement was in excess of $65 million.

$50 million: Army doctors fail to timely deliver baby after mother suffers amniotic fluid embolism: baby suffers brain damage.

M.W. v. United States (Texas). Army doctors at Darnall Army Community Hospital, Fort Hood, Texas, were negligent in the delivery of this child, causing him to suffer brain damage. The mother suffered an amniotic fluid embolism. The family received a structured recovery with an expected payout in excess of $50 million.

$39 million: Army doctors fail to recognize fetal distress: baby suffers severe brain injury during birth.

T.T. v. United States (Germany). Army doctors at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, Germany negligently failed to recognize fetal distress during labor causing the baby to suffer a severe brain injury and cerebral palsy. The settlement included cash and a medical trust to cover the needs of the child for life. The projected lifetime payment from the settlement was in excess of $39 million.

$38 million: Army Nurse Midwife negligently delays calling for help when baby born not breathing: baby suffers severe brain injury from delayed resuscitation.

S.L. v. United States (Germany). An Army nurse-midwife at Heidelberg Army Hospital in Germany did not recognized the baby was in distress during labor. When the baby was born not breathing, the midwife unsuccessfully tried to resuscitate the baby herself before calling for help from a pediatrician, causing the baby to suffer brain damage and cerebral palsy. The settlement included cash and a medical trust to cover the needs of the child for life. The projected lifetime payment from the settlement was in excess of $38 million.

$32 million: Army doctors failed to recognize fetal distress: baby suffers severe brain damage during birth.

N.T. v. United States (Texas). Army doctors at Darnall Army Community Hospital, Fort Hood, Texas failed to recognize fetal distress during labor causing the baby to suffer a severe brain injury and cerebral palsy. The recovery for the family included cash and a medical trust to cover the needs of the child for life with a projected lifetime payment in excess of $32 million.

$21 million: VBAC attempt results in uterine rupture: baby suffers severe brain damage during birth.

K.W. v. United States (Oklahoma). Army doctors at Reynolds Army Community Hospital, Fort Sill Oklahoma, negligently attempted a VBAC and failed to appropriately monitor the mother leading to a uterine rupture. An emergency c-section was done but it was too late and the baby suffered severe brain injury and cerebral palsy. The recovery for the family included cash and a medical trust to cover the needs of the child for life with a projected lifetime payment in excess of $21 million.

$19 million: Air Force doctors failed to recognize fetal distress: baby suffers severe brain damage.

T.L. v. United States (South Carolina). Air Force doctors at Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, were negligent in the delivery of this baby by failing to timely recognize fetal distress. The family recovered cash upfront, as well as a lifetime medical trust and monthly income supplements for life, all in excess of a present day value of $3 million, with a lifetime payout of over $19 million.

$15 million: Air Force doctors delay in performing emergency c-section after placental abruption: baby suffers severe brain injury during birth.

T.C. v. United States (Florida). Air Force doctors at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, failed to timely perform an emergency c-section after the mother suffered a placental abruption causing the baby to suffer severe brain damage and cerebral palsy. The recovery for the family included cash and a medical trust to cover the needs of the child for life with an expected lifetime payment in excess of $15 million.

$15 million: Navy doctors fail to recognize fetal distress: baby suffers severe brain injury during birth.

B.T. v. United States (Puerto Rico). Navy doctors at the Naval Hospital, Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, failed to recognize fetal distress during labor resulting in severe brain damage to the baby. The child’s injuries were so severe that she had a significantly shortened life expectancy. The case settled with an expected payout of over $15 million.

$15 million: Army doctors fail to report positive Group B strep test; mother not treated with antibiotics in labor: baby gets Group B infection during birth and suffers brain damage.

K.I. v. United States (Hawaii). Doctors at Tripler Army Medical Center, Hawaii got a positive Group B test result on the mother but then did not treat her with antibiotics during labor. As a result, the baby acquired Group B strep meningitis during the birth and suffered brain damage. The recovery for the family included cash and a medical trust to cover the needs of the child for life with a projected lifetime payment in excess of $15 million.

$13 million: Army doctors fail to recognize fetal distress: baby suffers severe brain injury during birth.

F.B. v. United States (Germany). Army doctors in at Nürnberg Army Community Hospital, Germany failed to recognize fetal distress during labor causing the baby to suffer a severe brain injury and cerebral palsy. The settlement included cash and a medical trust to cover the needs of the child for life. The projected lifetime payment from the settlement was in excess of $13 million.

$13 million: Army doctors fail to treat preeclampsia and fail to recognize fetal distress: baby suffers brain damage.

B.C. v. United States (Colorado). Army doctors at Evans Army Community Hospital, Fort Carson, CO, failed to timely diagnose and treat the mother for preeclampsia and the baby for signs of fetal distress, causing the baby to suffer severe perinatal asphyxia and brain hemorrhage. She was left with spastic quadriplegia, cerebral palsy, and other devastating injuries. The recovery for the family included upfront cash for the parents and the baby, a medical trust to cover the needs of the child for life, and wage replacement for the child’s life. The projected payout over the child’s lifetime was over $13 million.

$7.1 million: Doctors allow first time mother to attempt vaginal breech birth; baby’s head gets stuck: baby suffers brain damage.

K.W. v. Civilian Provider (Minnesota). Doctors allowed a first time mother to attempt a breech birth, which resulted in the baby’s head being trapped in the vagina. The baby suffered brain damage. The family recovered in excess of $7.1 million.

$6.7 million: Air Force doctors negligently fail to recognize and treat preterm labor: baby delivered prematurely and suffers injuries.

N.H. v. United States (North Dakota). Air Force doctors at Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota failed to recognize signs of premature labor and the baby was born at a hospital unprepared to deal with a premature infant. The baby suffered from prematurity related issues. The recovery for the family included cash and a medical trust to cover the needs of the child for life with a projected lifetime payment in excess of $6.7 million.

$6.43 million:  Army nurses negligently fail to alert doctor to dangerously high blood pressure during labor: mother has a seizure and baby suffers brain damage.

M.T. v. United States Army (Texas).  Army nurses failed to notice or report to the attending doctors that the mother’s blood pressure was dangerously high while she was pushing.  The mother suffered a seizure and coded but made a full recovery.  The baby was deprived of oxygen during his mother’s seizure and suffered a brain injury.  Texas has a non-economic damage cap of $250,000 that limited pain and suffering damages in this case. The recovery for the family included cash and a medical trust to cover the needs of the child for life with a projected lifetime payment in excess of $6.4 million.

$3.8 million: Navy doctors allow mother to push for over four hours: baby suffers mild brain injury.

C.L. v. United States Navy (Illinois). Navy doctors at Great Lakes Naval Hospital, Illinois allowed the mother to push for more than four hours despite signs of fetal distress. The baby suffered a brain injury but with therapy made a significant recovery. The settlement included cash and a medical trust to cover the needs of the child for life. The projected lifetime payment from the settlement was in excess of $3.8 million.

$3.8 million: Indian Health Service doctors fail to treat high blood pressure in mother: baby suffers brain damage.

D.B. v. United States (North Dakota). Indian Health Service (IHS) doctors failed to treat a mother’s dangerously high blood pressure causing the baby to suffer lack of oxygen resulting in brain damage. After trial with a verdict for the plaintiff and an appeal by the United States, the case settled for a present day value of $3.8 million.

$2.19 million: Army doctors fail to diagnose and treat preterm labor; premature infant delivered in toilet just one hour after mother was seen in clinic: baby has brain damage.

K.T. v. United States (Germany). Army doctors in Germany failed to timely diagnose preterm labor and bleeding and sent this pregnant active duty mother home without treatment. Just one hour later, she delivered her premature baby in the toilet. The baby suffers from cerebral palsy. The Army claimed nothing could have been done to stop the premature birth. The recovery for the family included cash, and a medical trust fund with an expected payout of over $2.19 million.

$1.5 million: Navy doctors fail to timely treat irregular heartbeat in fetus: baby born with cerebral palsy.

F.I. v. United States (Virginia). Navy doctors at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, Virginia noted the fetus had an abnormal heartbeat during fetal monitoring but failed to treat her until after birth causing her to develop mild cerebral palsy. The Navy claimed the irregular heart rate was not the cause of the child’s injuries. The recovery for the family included cash and a medical trust to cover the needs of the child for life with a projected lifetime payment in excess of $1.8 million.

$1.3 million: Air Force doctors fail to recognize fetal distress: baby suffers brain damage.

O.W. v. United States (Illinois). Air Force doctors at Scott Air Force Base Hospital, Illinois, were negligent in the delivery of this child, resulting in brain damage. The present day value of the recovery was $1.3 million, with provision to structure the money to take care of the child over his entire lifetime.

$1.3 million: Navy doctors failed to recognize fetal distress: baby suffers brain damage.

B.T. v. United States (California). Navy doctors at the Naval Hospital, Long Beach, California, were negligent in their delivery of the baby causing brain injury. The family recovered in excess of $1.3 million present day value.

$1 million: Air Force doctors negligently use forceps: baby suffers traumatic brain injury.

E.C. v. United States (Ohio). Air Force doctors at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, negligently used forceps during delivery causing trauma to the baby’s head. The Air Force claimed forceps use was needed to save the baby’s life. The recovery for the family included cash upfront, as well as a benefit for the child, with a lifetime payout of almost $1 million.

$1 million: Army doctors failed to recognize fetal distress: baby suffers brain damage.

K.L. v. United States (Georgia). Army doctors at Eisenhower Army Medical Center, Fort Gordon, Georgia, failed to timely diagnose and treat fetal distress, resulting in brain injury to the child. The family recovered $1 million present day value.

$670,000: Army doctors cut umbilical cord before baby is born: baby suffers lack of oxygen to brain.

K.I. v. United States (Texas). Army doctors at Darnall Army Community Hospital, Fort Hood, Texas, cut the baby’s umbilical cord before he was fully delivered, resulting in lack of oxygen to the child’s brain. Although he suffered what appeared to be a stroke during birth, he made an excellent recovery. The child recovered a settlement with an expected payout of over $670,000.

$620,000: Army doctors fracture baby’s skull during forceps delivery.

J.C. v. United States (Washington). Army doctors at Madigan Army Medical Center, Fort Lewis, Washington, were negligent in their use of forceps to deliver a baby resulting in a fractured skull and bleeding in his brain. He ultimately made an excellent recovery. The structured recovery for the family included cash upfront for the baby, the mother and the father, a college fund and an income supplement for life for the child with a payout of $620,000.

$300,000: Air Force doctors used too much Pitocin and misused a vacuum extractor: baby suffers injury.

C.M. v. United States (Japan). Air Force doctors at Yokota Air Base, Japan, were negligent during the delivery of this child by failing to respond appropriately to signs of fetal distress, using Pitocin inappropriately, failing to perform an emergency cesarean section in a timely manner, and finally using a vacuum extractor improperly. Despite her traumatic birth, the child made a full recovery. The child recovered $175,000, which was put into a structure that was expected to pay her over $300,000.

$200,000: Army doctors negligently use vacuum extraction multiple times during delivery: baby suffers stroke during birth.

V.J. v. United States (Georgia). Army doctors at Martin Army Community Hospital, Fort Benning, Georgia, made multiple attempts to deliver the baby by vacuum extraction. When the vacuum failed, the doctors moved to a cesarean section. At one year old, the child was diagnosed as having had a stroke. There was a major dispute over the cause of the child’s stroke, as it was not detected until almost one year after birth. A life care trust was set up for the child with funds totaling $200,000 present value.

$200,000: Air Force doctors failed to recognize fetal distress: mild injuries to mother and baby.

C.T. v. United States (Mississippi). Air Force doctors at Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, were negligent in the delivery causing mild injuries to the baby and mother. The family recovered $200,000.

$65,000: Army doctors place forceps in the wrong place on the baby’s head: baby suffers eye injury.

N.K. v. United States (Texas). Army doctors at Darnall Army Community Hospital, Fort Hood, Texas, were negligent in using forceps, damaging the baby’s eye. The child recovered well from the injury, and the United States agreed to pay cash upfront, as well as a college fund, with a payout of approximately $65,000.

Shoulder Dystocia

$3.99 million: Army doctors use excessive force during shoulder dystocia: baby suffers Erb’s palsy.

K.D. v. United States (Virginia). Army doctors at DeWitt Army Community Hospital, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, negligently failed to do a cesarean section, and traumatically delivered the baby resulting in a shoulder dystocia injury. The child had a permanent brachial plexus injury/Erb’s palsy to his right arm and shoulder. The mother also suffered a third degree laceration and became anemic due to blood loss during delivery. Recovery for the child under the FTCA included upfront cash, college funds, monthly income supplements, lump sum payments throughout his life, as well as a medical trust fund. The mother also recovered for her injuries. The projected lifetime payment of the settlement was $3.99 million.

$2.6 million: Army doctors use excessive force delivering baby by c-section: baby has Erb’s palsy.

F.F. v. United States (Washington). Army doctors at Madigan Army Hospital, Fort Lewis, Washington used excessive force to deliver the baby during a c-section causing an Erb’s palsy injury. The FTCA settlement included cash and a medical trust to cover the needs of the child for life. The projected lifetime payment from the settlement was in excess of $2.6 million.

$446,000: Air Force doctors use excessive traction during shoulder dystocia: baby suffers temporary Erb’s palsy.

E.E. v. United States (New York). There was a shoulder dystocia during birth but the baby had a good recovery. The child recovered $446,000 present value.

$200,000: Navy doctors pull too hard during shoulder dystocia: baby has mild Erb’s palsy.

M.T. v. United States (Japan). Navy doctors at the United States Naval Hospital, Okinawa, Japan, failed to detect a large baby, and therefore, a shoulder dystocia developed. The child suffered a mild brachial plexus/Erb’s palsy injury and recovered $200,000.

$150,000: Navy doctors mishandle shoulder dystocia: baby dies.

B.V. v. United States (Japan). Navy doctors at the United States Naval Hospital, Yokosuka, Japan, were negligent during the delivery of the child, resulting in a severe shoulder dystocia and death of the child at birth. The Navy vigorously defended the case and claimed the baby’s death was caused by a massive infection, not the shoulder dystocia. The mother recovered $150,000.

Pediatric Malpractice

$24 million: Navy doctors fail to timely treat severe anemia: baby suffers brain damage.

C.N. v. United States (Italy). Navy doctors at the Naval Hospital in Naples, Italy, failed to timely diagnose and treat the child for anemia, resulting in severe brain damage. The family recovered upfront cash, a medical trust to cover the child’s medical needs for life, as well as monthly payments for life. The projected payout was over $24 million.

$9.7 million:  Navy doctors fail to timely diagnose spinal cord tumor causing paralysis.

B.F. v. United States Navy (Italy).  Navy doctors failed to timely diagnose a neuroblastoma tumor that was pressing on a one year old child’s spinal cord.   By the time a correct diagnosis was made, the child was a paraplegic.  The child and her parents recovered cash upfront, a medical trust fund, and annuity income supplement payments in the future, all with an expected lifetime payout of over $9.7 million.

$8.4 million: Army doctors fail to diagnose and treat a congenital heart defect: child suffers brain damage.

N.S. v. United States (Germany). Army doctors in Germany failed to timely diagnose and treat congenital heart defect in a child causing brain injury to the child. The child recovered cash upfront, a medical trust fund, and annuity income supplement payments in the future, all with an expected lifetime payout of over $8.4 million.

$4.3 million: Army doctors fail to diagnose brain tumor: child loses vision in one eye.

V.C. v. United States (Germany). Army doctors at the 130th General Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany, failed to timely diagnose and treat a brain tumor allowing it to grow dramatically in size. This negligence caused loss of vision in one eye, and reduced the life expectancy in this five-year-old boy. Recovery for the family included upfront cash, as well as monthly payments to the mother and monthly payments for life to the child both inside and outside of a medical trust fund, as well as college payments and income supplement after age of majority. The expected payout was in excess of $4.3 million.

$2.5 million: Navy doctors delay diagnosis of brain tumor: child has reduced life expectancy.

K.H. v. United States (Italy). Navy doctors at United States Naval Hospital, Sigonella, Italy, failed to timely diagnose and treat a brain tumor, resulting in significant injuries to the child. He was four months old at the time when the tumor should have been diagnosed; yet it was not diagnosed until 12 months later. At the time the case was resolved, the child had no evidence of cancer. The child received a medical trust fund for life, cash, and a college fund payment. The projected payments over the lifetime of the child were in excess of $2.5 million.

$2.1 million: Army doctor intubated a premature baby in her esophagus instead of her trachea during transport: baby suffers additional brain damage.

K.T. v. United States (Germany). Army doctors were to intubate this premature baby for her transport to another hospital. They intubated her esophagus instead of her trachea causing lack of oxygen that exacerbated her existing brain damage. The settlement included cash and a medical trust to cover the needs of the child for life. The projected lifetime payment from the settlement was in excess of $2.1 million.

$2 million: Navy doctors fail to diagnose illness in child: child suffers brain damage.

V.Z. v. United States (Georgia). Navy doctors at Naval Medical Clinic, Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Georgia, were negligent in their care and treatment of this child. The case resolved for a present day value of $2 million, with projected payouts of significantly larger sums over the child’s lifetime.

$1.9 million: Army doctors prematurely remove child’s tracheotomy: child suffers respiratory arrest and brain damage.

D.I. v. United States (Colorado). Army doctors at Fitzsimons Army Medical Center, Colorado removed a handicapped child’s tracheotomy despite the fact he was too weak to breath on his own. He had a respiratory arrest and suffered additional brain damage. The settlement included cash and a medical trust to cover the needs of the child for life. The projected lifetime payment from the settlement (the child had a very limited life expectancy) was in excess of $1.9 million.

$1.3 million: Army doctors fail to timely diagnose malnutrition in baby: baby suffers brain damage.

F.W. v. United States (Virginia). Army doctors at the Radar Clinic, Fort Meyer, Virginia, failed to timely diagnose failure to thrive, resulting in severe malnutrition in a baby. The child recovered benefits in excess of $1.3 million.

$1 million: Army doctors fail to timely diagnose benign brain tumor: child suffers decreased vision.

M.Y. v. United States (Colorado). Army doctors at Fitzsimmons Army Medical Center, Aurora, Colorado, failed to timely diagnose a brain tumor in this child. The settlement was in excess of $1 million present day value.

$500,000: Army doctors failed to diagnose and treat spina bifida: bladder and bowel impairment results.

C.B. v. United States (Germany). Army doctors at Wuerzburg Army Hospital, Germany, failed to timely diagnose and treat spina bifida causing the child to suffer incontinence of both his bladder and bowels. There was a significant statute of limitations problem, but the case was successfully resolved providing a medical trust fund for the child’s life, as well as college funds and upfront cash with guaranteed payments of over $500,000.

$250,000: Air Force doctors fail to treat hemorrhage following circumcision: baby dies.

K.W. v. United States (Turkey). Air Force providers at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey, failed to diagnose hemorrhage after a circumcision, resulting in death of this one-week-old boy. The family recovered $250,000.

$125,000: Air Force doctors fail to diagnose congenital hip dysplasia: future hip replacement needed.

D.T. v. United States (South Dakota). Air Force doctors at United States Air Force Hospital, Ellsworth Air Force Base, South Dakota, failed to timely diagnose congenital hip dysplasia in a baby, increasing the likelihood she will need a hip replacement in the future. The child recovered $125,000.

$50,000: Army nurse burns infant’s foot: scarring results.

B.I. v. United States (New York). An Army nurse at the Keller Army Community Hospital, West Point, New York, applied a hot diaper to a newborn baby’s foot prior to a blood draw. The diaper burned the child’s foot and she was left with a small scar. The child recovered $50,000 cash present day value, as well as an annuity that would pay her a college fund.

Meningitis

$15 million, $11 million, $10 million: Substandard infection control caused three premature babies in Air Force NICU to get viral meningitis illness: all three babies suffered brain damage.

K.I., B.N., C.N. v. United States (Mississippi). Air Force nurses and housekeeping staff in the NICU at Keesler AFB, Mississippi were not following standard infection control procedures allowing three extremely premature babies to contract a viral illness. Despite difficulty proving what part of the babies’ injuries were due to the infection versus their extreme prematurity, all three cases were successfully resolved. The recoveries included cash and medical trusts to cover the needs of the child for life. The projected lifetime payments were in excess of $15 million, $11 million, and $9 million.

$9 million: Doctors delayed diagnosis of meningitis: boy suffers hearing loss.

E.W. v. Civilian Provider (Minnesota). Doctors failed to timely diagnose and treat meningitis in a baby resulting in hearing loss. The case was resolved shortly before trial with a projected total payout of over $9 million.

$1.6 million: Navy doctors delay diagnosis of meningitis: boy suffers hearing loss.

N.D. v. United States (Virginia). Navy doctors at the Naval Medical Center, Quantico, Virginia, failed to timely diagnose bacterial meningitis in a one-year-old boy. They sent him home from the clinic saying he had an eye infection. The child suffered profound hearing loss and is considered deaf. The child received a cochlear implant and with speech therapy was functioning at a normal level. Recovery for the family included a cash payment, as well as monthly payments to the family until the child was 18 years old when the payments would be made to the child, along with a college fund and lump sum payments throughout his life. The expected payout of the recovery was over $1.6 million.

$750,000: Air Force doctors delay treatment of meningitis: woman injured.

R.H. v. United States (Alabama). Army doctors at Fox Army Community Hospital, Red Stone Arsenal, Alabama, failed to timely diagnose meningitis resulting in significant injury. The family recovered $750,000 present day value in benefits.

$500,000: Air Force doctors delay diagnosis of meningitis: girl suffers brain damage.

B.Z. v. United States (Texas). Air Force doctors at the United States Air Force Hospital, Laughlin Air Force Base, Texas, failed to timely diagnose and treat meningitis in a three-day-old baby. The baby suffered brain damage. There was a significant statute of limitations problem, but the family recovered $500,000. When placed in a structure, it provided significant benefits to the child throughout her life.

Failure to Diagnose Cancer

$6.8 million: Army doctors delayed diagnosis of brain tumor: woman suffers brain damage.

N.S. v. United States (Arizona and Kansas). Army doctors at Raymond W. Bliss Army Community Hospital, Fort Huachuca, and Munson Army Community Hospital, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, failed to timely diagnose and treat a brain tumor in an adult woman. The two-year delay in diagnose caused permanent injury to this young mother. The woman and her family received a cash payment, a medical trust fund, and monthly income supplements, with an expected payout of over $6.8 million.

$4.3 million: Army doctors fail to diagnose brain tumor: child loses vision in one eye.

S.B. v. United States (Germany). Army doctors at the 130th General Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany, failed to timely diagnose and treat a brain tumor allowing it to grow dramatically in size. This negligence caused loss of vision in one eye, and reduced the life expectancy in this five-year-old boy. Recovery for the family included upfront cash, as well as monthly payments to the mother and monthly payments for life to the child both inside and outside of a medical trust fund, as well as college payments and income supplement after age of majority. The expected payout was in excess of $4.3 million.

$2.5 million: Navy doctors delay diagnosis of brain tumor: child has reduced life expectancy.

K.F. v. United States (Italy). Navy doctors at United States Naval Hospital, Sigonella, Italy, failed to timely diagnose and treat a brain tumor, resulting in significant injuries to the child. He was four months old at the time the tumor should have been diagnosed; yet it was not diagnosed until 12 months later. At the time the case was resolved, the child had no evidence of cancer. The child received a medical trust fund for life, cash, and a college fund payment. The projected payments over the lifetime of the child were in excess of $2.5 million.

$2 million: Army doctors delayed diagnosis of cervical cancer: woman dies.

C.N. v. United States (North Carolina). Army doctors at Womack Army Medical Center, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, as well as doctors at a civilian lab, failed to correctly interpret a Pap smear and evaluate other signs and symptoms of cervical cancer, resulting in the death of a 27-year-old mother of two. The family recovered in excess of $2 million.

$1.75 million: Army doctors delay biopsy on breast lump: cancer spreads.

N.M. v. United States (Kentucky). Army doctors at Ireland Army Hospital, Fort Campbell, Kentucky, delay over 9 months before doing a breast biopsy on the woman’s breast lump. The cancer spread and the woman recovered $1.75 million at trial, after settling with the civilian radiology before trial.

$1 million: Doctors fail to diagnose melanoma: man dies.

D.T. v. Civilian Lab (Minnesota). Doctors at a civilian lab read a biopsy on a mole as benign when it was actually skin cancer (melanoma). The man eventually died and the family recovered in excess of $1 million, present day value shortly before trial.

$500,000: VA doctors fail to timely diagnose lung cancer: man dies.

L.D. v. United States (California). Doctors at the Fresno Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center failed to timely diagnose lung cancer. A CT scan revealed a mass in the plaintiff’s lung, but this mass was not reported to the plaintiff until approximately 20 months later. By that time the cancer had metastasized and the plaintiff eventually died. The widow received $500,000 structured to provide her income for life.

$225,000: Air Force doctors failed to timely diagnose breast cancer requiring a total mastectomy rather than a lumpectomy.

L.B. v. United States (California). Air Force doctors delayed in performing a biopsy on a breast lump. All doctors agreed the young woman was still cured of her cancer, however. The case settled for a present day value of $225,000, with additional future payments to be paid if the cancer should return. To date, the young woman remains cancer-free.

$200,000: Army doctors delay diagnosis of colon cancer: woman has increased risk for recurrence.

N.T. v. United States (Panama). Army doctors at the Health Clinic, Fort Clayton, Panama, failed to appropriately respond to complaints of rectal bleeding, resulting in a delay in diagnosis of colon cancer. At the time the case was resolved, the plaintiff was cancer free. She recovered $200,000.

$135,000: Air Force doctors delay diagnosis of lymphoma: woman suffers earlier menopause due to chemotherapy.

D.D. v. United States (Mississippi). Air Force doctors at Keesler Air Force Base Medical Center, Mississippi, failed to timely diagnose a lump in the 44-year-old plaintiff’s neck as lymphoma. At the time the case resolved, the plaintiff was determined to be cancer free, but suffered early menopause as a result of the chemotherapy required to treat her cancer. She recovered $135,000.

$125,000: Army doctors delay diagnosis of colon cancer: man has increased risk for recurrence.

G.W. v United States (Kansas). Army doctors at Irwin Army Community Hospital, Fort Riley, Kansas, delayed in their diagnosis and treatment of this man for colon cancer. He was deemed cured of the cancer, but is at some higher risk of future recurrence. The case resolved for $125,000.

Newborn Screening

$28 million: Navy doctors fail to report a positive newborn screen for PKU: baby suffers brain damage.

V.C. v. United States (California). Navy doctors at Balboa Naval Hospital, San Diego, California and a private lab failed to timely report positive newborn screening results for PKU. The settlement with the civilian lab resulted in a structured settlement with total expected benefits in excess of $9 million. The case against the United States also settled shortly before trial and resulted in payment to this child and to his family of an additional $19 million, for an expected total payout in the case of over $28 million.

$4 million: Lab fails to report positive newborn screen for galactosemia: baby loses vision in one eye.

D.N. v. Civilian Lab (Washington, D.C.). This case involved the failure to timely report positive newborn screening results for galactosemia. The child suffered loss of vision in one eye. The case settled at mediation shortly before trial for a present value of $1 million, with an expected lifetime payment in excess of $4 million.

[CONFIDENTIAL AMOUNT]: Lab mishandles newborn PKU sample: baby not treated for PKU and suffers brain damage.

R.P. v. Civilian Lab. A civilian lab inappropriately processed a newborn screening blood sample, resulting in failure to timely diagnose and treat PKU. The baby suffered brain damage. Recovery for the child and family included a large upfront cash sum, significant monthly payments throughout the child’s life, as well as future periodic payments to the child.

Wrongful Death

A. Stillborn Babies/Newborn Babies/Children

$1 million: Army doctors fail to recognize fetal distress: baby dies at birth.

B.C. v. United States (North Carolina). Army Doctors at Womack Army Medical Center, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, failed to timely diagnose and treat fetal distress during a Pitocin induction in a diabetic mother resulting in the baby’s death within a few minutes after birth. The recovery for the family included cash, as well as a tax-free monthly income for life with estimated lifetime benefits of almost $1 million.

$518,000: Army doctors fail to recognize fetal distress: baby dies before birth.

V.G. v. United States (Louisiana). Army doctors at Bayne-Jones Army Community Hospital, Louisiana, failed to timely diagnose and treat fetal distress resulting in a stillborn baby. The mother recovered a mix of cash and annuities resulting in a total lifetime benefit of $518,000.

$425,000: Navy doctors fail to appropriately monitor twin pregnancy: one twin dies before birth.

B.K. v. United States (Maryland). Navy doctors at the National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, were negligent in management of the twin pregnancy, resulting in stillbirth of one of the twins. The family recovered $425,000.

$300,000: Air Force doctors failed to timely react to fetal distress: baby dies three weeks after birth.

R.B. v. United States (Nevada). Air Force doctors at Michael O’Callaghan Federal Hospital, Nellis AFB, Nevada, failed to timely deliver this baby despite warning signs of fetal distress and meconium. The baby was born with Apgars of 0 and 0, and died three weeks after his birth. The case settled for $300,000.

$250,000: Navy doctors failed to detect decreased amniotic fluid on ultrasound: baby is stillborn.

N.S. v. United States (Italy). Navy doctors at the United States Naval Hospital, Naples, Italy, failed to detect decreased amniotic fluid and fetal distress, which resulted in a stillborn baby. The family recovered $250,000.

$250,000: Air Force doctors slow to respond to placental abruption in twin pregnancy: one twin dies.

T.T. v. United States (Japan). Air Force doctors at Yokota Air Force Base, Japan, failed to timely respond to a placental abruption in a twin pregnancy resulting in death in one of the twins. The family recovered $250,000.

$225,000: Air Force doctors fail to treat dehydration: child dies.

B.L. v. United States (Texas). Air Force doctors at Wilford Hall Medical Center, Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, failed to adequately treat dehydration in a seven-week old-child resulting in the baby’s death. The family recovered $225,000.

$220,000: Army doctors rupture membranes with baby at a high station: cord prolapses and baby dies.

N.M. v. United States (Kansas). Doctors at Irwin Army Community Hospital, Ft. Riley, Kansas ruptured membranes despite knowing the baby’s head was not engaged in the pelvis. The umbilical cord prolapsed, cutting off oxygenate the baby’s brain. Military doctors additionally delayed in performing an emergency c-section. The baby suffered severe brain damage and died shorty after birth. Damages we capped at $250,000 and the family recovered $220,000.

$200,000: Navy doctors miss twin-to-twin transfusion: one twin dies before birth.

K.G. v. United States (South Carolina). Doctors at the Naval Hospital, Beaufort, South Carolina, failed to diagnose twin-to-twin transfusion resulting in the stillbirth of one of the twins. The family recovered $200,000.

$200,000: Air Force doctors fail to recognize fetal distress: baby dies at birth.

S.W. v. United States (Idaho). Air Force doctors at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, were negligent during the birth of the child, resulting in her death. The family recovered $200,000.

$150,000: Navy doctors slow to respond to placental abruption: baby dies.

N.T. v. United States (Japan). Navy doctors at the Naval Hospital in Okinawa, Japan, failed to timely respond to a placental abruption, resulting in the death of the baby. The family recovered $150,000.

$150,000: Navy doctors mishandle shoulder dystocia: baby dies.

B.V. v. United States (Japan). Navy doctors at the United States Naval Hospital, Yokosuka, Japan, were negligent during the delivery of the child, resulting in a severe shoulder dystocia and death of the child at birth. The mother recovered $150,000.

$145,000: Army doctors fail to timely treat kidney infection: child dies.

S.L. v. United States (Korea). Army doctors at the 121st Army General Hospital, Seoul, Korea, failed to timely diagnose and treat a kidney infection in a one-year-old child, resulting in her death. The family recovered $145,000.

$140,000: Army doctors miss kidney disease on prenatal ultrasound: premature baby dies shortly after birth.

N.C. v. United States (Oklahoma). Army doctors at Reynolds Army Community Hospital, Fort Sill, Oklahoma, failed to timely diagnose a birth defect in the baby’s kidney while the mother was pregnant, resulting in his death shortly after his preterm birth. The family recovered $140,000.

$100,000: Air Force doctors negligently removed cervical polyp in pregnant woman: fetus dies.

K.N. v. United States (California). Air Force doctors at Travis Air Force Base, California, removed a cervical polyp in a woman who was pregnant, resulting in the premature delivery and death of an 18-week fetus. The mother recovered $100,000.

$100,000: Army doctors neglect to do a cervical exam: baby born very prematurely and dies.

E.C. v. United States (North Carolina). Army doctors at Womack Army Medical Center, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, failed to do a cervical examination, and therefore failed to detect preterm labor, an incompetent cervix, and failed to place the cerclage. This resulted in the premature birth and death of the child at 19 weeks gestation. The case resolved for $100,000.

$90,000. Army doctors slow to respond to placental abruption: baby dies before birth.

O.J. v. United States (Alaska). Army doctors at Bassett Army Community Hospital in Fort Wainwright, Alaska, failed to timely deliver a baby after the mother experienced a placental abruption. The United States claimed they could not have saved the baby even with earlier intervention. The family recovered $90,000. 

B. Adult

$2.5 million: Army doctors fail to treat severe infection: woman dies.

T.M. v. United States (Germany). Army doctors at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, Germany, failed to timely diagnose and treat a severe infection, resulting in the plaintiff’s death from septic shock. She left a husband and a minor daughter. She was 45 at the time of her death. The family recovered cash upfront, lifetime income benefits for the father and the child, as well as a college fund for the child with a payout of over $2.5 million.

$1.9 million: Army doctors fail to monitor patient after gastric bypass: woman dies.

T.J. v. United States (Georgia). Doctors at Martin Army Community Hospital, Fort Benning, Georgia, were negligent during the plaintiff’s gastric bypass surgery. Cardiac monitors were not applied as she was moved to Intensive Care after the surgery, and by the time she arrived it was found she was in cardiac arrest and she died shortly thereafter. She was survived by a husband and a ten-year-old daughter. The recovery for the family included cash upfront, a monthly payment to the surviving husband, a college fund, and monthly payments for life for the surviving child. The expected lifetime payout was in excess of $1.9 million.

$1.59 million: Air Force doctors failed to remove a retained placental fragment causing a massive maternal hemorrhage: woman dies.

L.G. v. United States (Italy). Doctors at 31st Medical Group, Aviano Air Base, Italy failed to detect a retained placental fragment and then failed to react quickly to the mother’s blood loss, resulting in her death. The surviving husband and two children recovered $1.59 million.

$1.25 million: Army and Navy doctors fail to detect heart defect in pregnant mother: woman dies.

I.T. v. United States (Germany and Italy). Doctors at Landsthul misread an ECHO cardiogram and doctors at the Naval Hospital, Naples, Italy, failed to diagnose a heart murmur in a pregnant woman, causing her to develop hear failure and die shortly after her baby was delivered. The husband and surviving uninjured child recovered $1.25 million.

$1 million: Doctors fail to diagnose twisted bowel (volvus) in pregnant woman: mother and baby die.

N.D. v. Civilian (Minnesota). Doctors failed to timely diagnose a twisted small bowel in pregnant woman. Both the mother and her 32-week-fetus died. The surviving spouse recovered $1 million present day value

$1 million: Army doctors fail to treat post-delivery hemorrhage: woman dies.

N.R. v. United States (Germany). Army doctors at the United States Army Hospital, Nürnberg, Germany, failed to timely recognize and treat a postpartum hemorrhage, resulting in the death of the mother. The deceased woman was survived by her husband and three sons. The family recovered upfront cash, as well as annuities for the father and all three children, with an expected payout of over $1 million.

$800,000: Navy doctors failed to diagnose congenital heart defect (VSD): woman dies.

I.N. v. United States (Italy). Navy doctors at Sigonella Navy Base, Italy, failed to correctly diagnose and treat a congenital heart defect in a young pregnant mother. She died shortly after giving birth. The baby was not injured. The family recovered $800,000 present day value.

$500,000: Army doctors fail to respond to amniotic fluid embolism: woman dies.

K.C. v. United States (North Carolina). Army doctors at Womack Army Community Hospital, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, failed to timely respond to an amniotic fluid embolism in the 20-year-old mother who then died shortly after childbirth. The United States argued they could not have saved the mother. The recovery included cash payment to the surviving husband, as well as college funds, income supplement, and guaranteed future lump sum payments to the surviving child. Guaranteed payments from the settlement were over $500,000.

$430,000: Army doctors failed to timely discover they had nicked the bowel during laparoscopic gallbladder removal: woman dies.

C. I. v. United States (Texas):  Army doctors at Darnall Army Community Hospital, Ft. Hood, Texas failed to notice they had nicked a woman’s bowel during a laparoscopic cholecystectomy and sent her home despite signs she was developing an infection.  The wife and mother of three adult children developed septic shock and died.  The Texas damage cap of $250,000 limited recovery for non-economic damages in this case.  The settlement was reached at medication in U.S. District Court.

$385,000: Air Force doctors miss aortic aneurysm: man dies.

S.C. v. United States (Oklahoma). Air Force doctors at Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, failed to properly diagnose hypertension and abdominal pain, which were caused by an abdominal aortic aneurysm resulting in death of this 60 year old man. The recovery included cash for the widow, as well as monthly income guaranteed for her life with an estimated lifetime payout of over $385,000.

$325,000: Army doctors negligently monitor post-operatively: man dies.

K.S. v. United States (North Carolina). Army doctors at Womack Army Medical Center, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, were negligent in their treatment following surgery resulting in this man’s death. He was survived by a wife and adult children. The widow and children received $325,000.

$255,000: Air Force doctors fail to diagnose bile leak: man dies.

L.K. v. United States (Virginia). Air Force doctors at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia, and Portsmouth Naval Medical Center, Virginia, negligently failed to timely diagnose, treat and repair a bile leak following a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This resulted in the 68-year-old man’s death. The widow recovered cash upfront, along with an annuity to pay her a monthly benefit for life with lifetime benefits in excess of $255,000.

$70,000: VA doctors send man with chest pain home: man dies.

S.H. v. VA Hospital (Wisconsin). Veterans Administration doctors at the William S. Middleton Memorial VA Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin, negligently failed to timely treat severe coronary artery disease sending him home from the Urgent Care Clinic. He died the next day. The VA claimed his heart disease was so severe he could not have been saved. His surviving children received $70,000.

Hospital Negligence

$600,000: Army mismanages post-op recovery: woman injured.

T.T. v. United States (Utah). Air Force doctors at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, were negligent in their care and treatment of this woman following a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. She recovered in excess of $600,000.

$200,000: Army delays in responding to bleeding: woman injured.

K.S. v. United States (Washington, D.C.). Army doctors at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D.C., failed to note hemorrhage on a CT scan of the abdomen, resulting in injury. The woman recovered $200,000.

$45,000: Army nurses do not recognize IV infiltration: scarring on hand.

B.C. v. United States (Virginia). Nurses at DeWitt Army Community Hospital, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, failed to detect an IV infiltration resulting in scarring in the hand. $45,000 was recovered.

Veterans Administration

$500,000: VA doctors fail to timely diagnose lung cancer: man dies.

J.D. v. United States (California). Doctors at the Fresno Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center failed to timely diagnose lung cancer. A CT scan revealed a mass in the plaintiff’s lung, but this mass was not reported to the plaintiff until approximately 20 months later. By that time the cancer had metastasized and the plaintiff eventually died. His widow received $500,000.

$400,000: VA doctors fail to treat surgical complications: bowel injury results.

H.O. v. United States (Washington). Veterans Administration doctors at Puget Sound VA Hospital, Washington, provided inappropriate follow up care following colon surgery. The plaintiff recovered $400,000.

$375,000: VA doctors fail to monitor after gastric bypass: woman dies.

J.W. v. United States (Wisconsin). Doctors at Wood Veterans Administration Medical Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, were negligent during gastric bypass surgery, resulting in death. The claimant settled for $375,000 present value.

$350,000: VA doctors inject wrong medication: nerve injury results.

N.W. v. United States (Georgia). Veterans Administration doctors at the VA Medical Center in Augusta, Georgia, injected the wrong medication into a woman damaging her nerves. A present day value of the recovery for the family was $350,000.

$200,000: VA doctors fail to timely treat complications: hip injury results.

C.T. v. United States (Minnesota). Veterans Administration doctors at the VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota, failed to recognize complications of a hip replacement, resulting in injuries. The plaintiff recovered $200,000.

$100,000: VA nurses fail to monitor suicidal patient: man dies.

H.N. v. United States (Minnesota). Veterans Administration doctors at the VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota, failed to appropriately supervise a man with a long history of mental problems, and he hung himself in the psychiatric ward. The widow recovered $100,000.

$70,000: VA doctors send man home with chest pain: man dies.

S.J. v. United States (Wisconsin). Veterans Administration doctors at the William S. Middleton Memorial VA Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin, negligently failed to timely treat severe coronary artery disease sending him home from the Urgent Care Clinic. He died the next day. His surviving adult children received $70,000.

Failure to Diagnose

$3 million: Army doctors delay treatment of flesh eating disease: severe disfigurement results.

E.C. v. United States (Missouri). Army doctors at General Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, failed to timely diagnose and treat an aggressive infection, also known as a flesh eating bacteria (necrotizing fasciitis), resulting in the need to remove significantly more tissue than what would have been otherwise required from the patient. The family recovered a combination of cash and future payments, with an expected payout in excess of $3 million.

$750,000: Air Force doctors delay treatment of meningitis: woman injured.

R.H. v. United States (Alabama). Army doctors at Fox Army Community Hospital, Red Stone Arsenal, Alabama, failed to timely diagnose meningitis resulting in significant injury. The family recovered $750,000 present day value in benefits.

$375,000: Air Force doctors fail to diagnose stroke: no TPA given.

K.E. v. United States (Ohio). Air Force doctors at Wright-Patterson Medical Center, Ohio, failed to timely diagnose and treat a stroke. It is alleged that treatment of TPA would have minimized the man’s injuries. The family recovered upfront cash, as well as an annuity to pay lifetime benefits. The recovery had a present day value of $375,000.

$300,000: Air Force doctors fail to diagnose appendicitis: appendix ruptures and fetus dies.

N.V. v. United States (Japan). Air Force doctors at Yokota Air Base, Japan, failed to timely diagnose and treat an inflamed appendix causing it to rupture. The woman, who was newly pregnant, suffered a miscarriage, along with sepsis, but recovered well following appropriate treatment. She recovered $300,000.

$300,000: Army doctors delay in diagnosing bowel perforation following tubal ligation: prolonged hospitalization results.

K.N. v. United States (Colorado). Army doctors at Evans Army Community Hospital failed to timely diagnose a bowel perforation that happened during a tubal ligation. Although the woman suffered sepsis, she made a good recovery. She received compensation of 300,000.

$200,000: Air Force doctors fail to diagnose PID: infertility results.

D.E. v. United States (South Carolina). Air Force doctors at Shaw Air Force Base Hospital, South Carolina, failed to timely diagnose pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), resulting in the plaintiff’s loss of the ability to conceive a child. The plaintiff recovered $200,000.

$75,000: Army doctors fail to diagnose bowel perforation: more surgery required.

K.D. v. United States (Virginia, Washington, D.C., and Maryland). Army doctors at DeWitt Army Community Hospital, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D.C., and National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, negligently failed to timely diagnose a bowel perforation that occurred during a laparoscopic tubal ligation. This resulted in development of an intraabdominal infection and sepsis, and required a subsequent surgery. The family recovered in excess of $75,000 present value, with the expected payout based on annuity purchase to be significantly higher.

Pharmacy Errors

$135,000: Pharmacy switches drugs: woman suffers hemorrhage.

N.E. v. Civilian Pharmacy (Minnesota). A pharmacist switched the labels on bottles between Prednisone and Coumadin (a blood thinner). The elderly woman suffered two life threatening hemorrhages, but recovered completely. The case was resolved for $135,000.

Prenatal Malpractice

$300,000: Air Force doctors fail to diagnose appendicitis: appendix ruptures and fetus dies.

N.V. v. United States (Japan). Air Force doctors at Yokota Air Base, Japan, failed to timely diagnose and treat an inflamed appendix causing it to rupture. The woman, who was newly pregnant, suffered a miscarriage, along with sepsis, but recovered well following appropriate treatment. She recovered $300,000.

$100,000: Navy doctors cause 4th degree laceration using forceps: reparative surgery required.

K.N. v. United States (Virginia). Navy doctors at the Naval Medical Center in Portsmouth, Virginia, inappropriately used forceps causing a 4th degree laceration in the mother. The mother required reparative surgeries. She recovered $100,000.

$99,000: Air Force lab mis-types blood: Rh negative mother becomes sensitized.

H.T. v. United States (Alabama). Air Force doctors at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, negligently claimed a woman was blood type Rh positive, when she was actually Rh negative, and therefore she failed to receive a Rhogam shot and became Rh sensitized, requiring increased monitoring in future pregnancies. The family received over $99,000.

$50,000: Air Force doctors fail to treat preeclampsia: mother suffers difficulty during delivery.

Z.H. v. United States (Texas). Air Force doctors at Eglin Air Force Base Hospital and Wilford Hall Medical Center, Texas, failed to appropriately treat severe preeclampsia causing difficult delivery and problems in the mother. She ultimately fully recovered. The family recovered $50,000.

Surgical Errors

$1.28 million. Army doctors remove too much bone during ankle surgery: woman suffers pain and disability.

C.N. v. United States (Germany). Army surgeons at Wuerzburg Army Health Clinic removed too much bone during an ankle surgery. The woman required a total ankle replacement. The case resolved for a payout of over $1.28 million in damages.

$325,000: Army doctors do unnecessary surgery: man suffers injury.

E.T. v. United States (Germany, Washington, D.C.). Army doctors at United States Army Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany, and at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D.C., performed inappropriate pancreatic surgery on the plaintiff causing injury. The man recovered $325,000.

$300,000: Doctors misread slide: woman’s breasts unnecessary removed.

M.W. v. Civilian (Minnesota). Doctors misread a woman’s pathology slide claiming she had breast cancer, and resulting in removal of her breast. The woman did not have breast cancer. She recovered $300,000.

$300,000: Army doctors slow to diagnose bowel perforation following tubal ligation: sepsis results.

K.N. v. United States (Colorado). Army doctors at Evans Army Community Hospital, Fort Carson, Colorado, failed to timely diagnose a bowel perforation following a tubal ligation. The young woman developed sepsis, but recovered well. The case resolved for $300,000.

$256,000: Army doctor negligently twists bowel when performing gastric bypass surgery: rapid weight loss, pain, and ultimately reversal of bypass required.

O.Q. v United States (Washington). Army doctors at Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, Washington, did not realize they had twisted the woman’s bowel when they put the stomach back into her abdomen following gastric bypass surgery. Further, they ignored warning signs of the twist for over six months before corrective surgery was done. A $256,000 cash settlement was reached under the FTCA.

Misread Prenatal Ultrasounds

$750,000: Navy doctors miss congenital defects on prenatal ultrasound: baby born with multiple problems.

F.V. v. United States (Maryland). Navy doctors at National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, misread a prenatal ultrasound, therefore failing to detect serious fetal abnormalities. The child was born with multiple problems. The present day value of the recovery was in excess of $750,000.

$500,000: Army doctors failed to diagnose and treat spina bifida: bladder and bowel impairment results.

C.B. v. United States (Germany). Army doctors at Wuerzburg Army Hospital failed to timely diagnose and treat spina bifida causing the child to suffer incontinence of both his bladder and bowels. There was a significant statute of limitations problem, but the case was successfully resolved providing a medical trust fund for the child’s life, as well as college funds and upfront cash with guaranteed payments of over $500,000.

$500,000: Army doctor missed spina bifida on prenatal ultrasound: baby suffers injuries.

P.S. v. United States (Louisiana). Army medical personnel at Bayne-Jones Army Hospital, Fort Polk, Louisiana, failed to appropriately read a prenatal ultrasound, missing spina bifida in the baby, causing him injuries at birth. The family recovered $500,000, which was structured into a trust fund for future care, as well as income supplement payments to the mother and the child.

Auto Accidents

$1.6 million: A special needs child was hit by a school bus at an American military school: child is brain injured.

T.B. v. United States (Germany). Army school personnel allowed a special needs child to use public bus transportation unsupervised, even though she needed supervision. The child ran into oncoming traffic, was hit by a school bus, and received serious injuries. The case settled for a present day value of over $1.6 million.

*Past results are reported to provide the reader with an indication of the types of matters we handle and do not and should not be construed to create an expectation of result in any other situation. For a discussion of how damages are calculated please see: Frequently Asked Questions: “How much is my case worth?

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